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About Digital Art / Professional Solveiga Priedniece24/Female/Latvia Group :iconkrita-free-art-app: Krita-Free-Art-App
Open Source Digital Painting
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Deviant for 3 Years
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Statistics 74 Deviations 255 Comments 5,914 Pageviews
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Favourites

Pikachu by WildWildGoose Pikachu :iconwildwildgoose:WildWildGoose 10 2 Elf Mage by Odysseusart Elf Mage :iconodysseusart:Odysseusart 86 4 FORCEMAGE APPRENTICE by Odysseusart
Mature content
FORCEMAGE APPRENTICE :iconodysseusart:Odysseusart 19 2
Lord of the Hogwarts Challenge | Krita Speedpaint by MarTs-Art Lord of the Hogwarts Challenge | Krita Speedpaint :iconmarts-art:MarTs-Art 14 8 Lecture by Deevad Lecture :icondeevad:Deevad 2,072 190 Harry Potter and the Little Owl Starter by Aliciane Harry Potter and the Little Owl Starter :iconaliciane:Aliciane 434 60 Aranea Highwind - Final Fantasy XV by NatashaKashkina Aranea Highwind - Final Fantasy XV :iconnatashakashkina:NatashaKashkina 100 2 Working Hard by Nesskain Working Hard :iconnesskain:Nesskain 602 4 Charlie Bone by Nesskain Charlie Bone :iconnesskain:Nesskain 608 6 I, the one by theDURRRRIAN I, the one :iconthedurrrrian:theDURRRRIAN 1,578 21 Vladimir by theDURRRRIAN Vladimir :iconthedurrrrian:theDURRRRIAN 678 11 Ars Goetia - Count Murmur by theDURRRRIAN Ars Goetia - Count Murmur :iconthedurrrrian:theDURRRRIAN 1,058 20 Deathstroke the Terminator - Unmasked by theDURRRRIAN Deathstroke the Terminator - Unmasked :iconthedurrrrian:theDURRRRIAN 989 14 Deathstroke the Terminator by theDURRRRIAN Deathstroke the Terminator :iconthedurrrrian:theDURRRRIAN 2,291 46 the Blue by myks0 the Blue :iconmyks0:myks0 146 28 Pepper Spin by Artgerm Pepper Spin :iconartgerm:Artgerm 3,788 88

Critiques


I'm not really at writing elaborate critiques, so I will just write about the things I like and the things that can be improved. :) I li...

by Azph

I have studied only basic of photography, so I will critique only things I am more familiar with - composition. I think, the photo woul...

by MizzMay

I like the design of the kitty, but I think it doesn't stand out from rest of the picture enough. One way in making him/her stand out w...


I like the face, it has a nice character to it. I think, the only problem with this painting would be the composition. You definitely s...

Groups

deviantID

undeadcrabstick
Solveiga Priedniece
Artist | Professional | Digital Art
Latvia
Hello there, and welcome to my DeviantArt page!

I grew up in a small town called Vangaži, in Latvia, and already as a kid, I knew that art was my thing, so I picked up my pencil and never stopped drawing. Currently, I am living in Riga, the capital of Latvia, and am willing to take on any challenge you are willing to throw at me, as long as it is not copyright infringing.

Twitter: twitter.com/undeadcrab
Facebook: www.facebook.com/Undeadcrab/
Youtube: www.youtube.com/channel/UCK65W…

If you want me to create some interesting artwork for you, please contact me via email undeadcrabstick@gmail.com
Interests

Activity


Ripcord Online Book Cover Artwork and design
A book cover art I did as a commission for Brian Simons.
Once The book gets published, I'll link it, so you could check it out, meanwhile here are some of his other stuff I made illustrations for: 
www.amazon.com/Travail-Online-…
www.amazon.com/Travail-Online-…
www.amazon.com/Travail-Online-…
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Hey, I'm thinking of doing a video critique on other artist's work, so that I could help the artist community grow. This is going to be an educational video, so it will be available for everyone to see, and in no way is it going to be disparaging towards the artist or their work.

Here's how the video is going to be made:
1)I will either receive your drawing or painting either on this thread or via DA note.
2)I will do a video recording where I comment about the strengths and weaknesses of your artwork, find what aspects of it needs improvement the most and give you advice on how to improve on it.
3)I edit the video and make sure to credit you and upload it on youtube, I will also add a link to your DA account in the description.
4) I send you a link to the video critique of your artwork.

Before you submit you should know a few things:
1. I will not accept any artwork that contains: sexual content, violence, and gore(some violence and blood is okay, as long as it doesn't give little kids nightmares)
2. After the video is uploaded it's going to stay there. Because it is going to be an educational video for NO commercial purposes it will fall under fair use, and if you change your mind and decide that you don't want your art in my video, I may take it down only if there is a good reason for it. Understand that producing youtube content takes a great deal of time.

Here are a few examples of my work, so you would have an idea of whether you want me to critique your work:
Style Experiment by undeadcrabstick A character portrait by undeadcrabstick OMG a dragon!!! O_O by undeadcrabstick Redhead by undeadcrabstick Attack on teh tomatoes!!! by undeadcrabstick
Luxidor Son Of Estre(sketch)
Just a quick sketch of one of the characters from my novel. Yes, that's a guy. The high elves is a species, which has adapted to a magical environment, where ones magical affinity was a key to survival. Because most predators and natural hazards had always been handled with magic, and there was little need for physical strength, the high elf men never become "big handsome tough guys". By other species the high elf men are often confused with women.
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For a long time, Wacom Cintiq was considered the best possible thing an artist would hope to get. Even today most artists drool over them... and then there's me. No, I don't think a screen on your tablet is necessarily improvement, and I will explain this a little further.

Now, we all use them, be it Wacom, huion, monoprice, etc. -- our graphics tablets are a vital tool for our survival as artists. But it's not just the tablets and you that do the job, it's also your PC, which brings me to my first point:

When it comes to efficiency, your computer is more important than your tablet. You can have the fanciest, prettiest tablet or Cintiq ever, but your workflow won't be improved if your potato of a PC crashes every time it tries to render a brush stroke. So, remember, when drooling on that shiny super tablet, that, when it comes to hardware, computer trumps the tablet. Don't get me wrong, a tablet is important, but a tiny, cheap Intuos on a decent PC will perform better, than a shiny new Cintiq on a ten-year-old relic.

The second point I want to make is: remember the shiny screen on that Cintiq? You don't need it! It looks cool, but it has its own downsides. The biggest selling point is that it is more efficient, it is more natural for you to look at your pen when you write or draw, and this is exactly what a Cintiq is! It is a premium product, designed for the professionals who have made it so far in their careers, that they need to churn out one artwork after another. They don't have the time to adjust, edit or redo their lines, like someone who's starting out does. It is a tool meant to increase your speed, but it has serious downsides as well:
    1. Posture: I can't stress this enough, but when working, proper posture is important. Of course, you can have a proper posture when working on a Cintiq, but you are more likely to have it when working with a regular tablet. When we work with a regular tablet, we sit up straight and relaxed, we look straight ahead at our computer monitor. When you have something like a Cintiq, you are most likely going to look down at it, which causes more strain on your neck, and you are more likely to slouch, which results in strain on your shoulders and back. This can cause multiple health issues, and the kicker is, the younger you are when starting this habit, the more and sooner these issues can develop. Remember to sit up straight, adjust your chair so that your knees and elbows are at a 90-degree angle, put something under your feet, if needed, and have your monitor adjusted to your eye level.
    2. Eye strain: is this really a surprise? A computer screen should be about an arm's length away from your eyes, and what if I told you, that the Cintiq is a computer screen? If you are going to stare at it for a prolonged time, make sure to get further away from it, and have your eyes checked. You must use prescription glasses when doing digital art, if you need them.
    3. Arm fatigue: now, this is probably not going to be a major problem for many people. Drawing on a Cintiq in a lot of ways is like drawing on an easel, so you'll need to lift your arm a bit more. When I started to draw still life on an easel, I noticed, that my arm would tire. This is because I spent most of my time drawing on a regular old Intuos, and didn't have to raise my hand so much. You can get used to it, so, it's just my pet peeve, I guess.
    4. The price: the Cintiqs are expensive, and, let's face it, for most artists it is unreasonable to buy something like this. You have to eat, you need that computer upgrade, extra ddr4 ram, better CPU, nicer graphics card. Buy those instead.

What's this, you say? There are more affordable alternatives to the Cintiq? No. No, there isn't. Is an iPad an alternative? Can it run photoshop or Corel Painter? What about Zbrush? No? Then it isn't an alternative.

But surface studio can run them, so it must be a good alternative! Wrong! Do you really want to spend a thousand on something that's going to be obsolete in a few years? Wanna bigger ram? Better processor? A badass gtx 1080? Too, bad, you can't get it, because a surface studio is basically a laptop with a giant screen, and, likely, has its parts soldered to the motherboard. For something that you are not about to carry around, you can save money by buying, or even building, a decent tower PC and getting a good quality monitor, which you can upgrade later to an even better one. A Cintiq or an Intuos is not going to become obsolete. Even in ten years, you will be able to hook it up to any PC that has the required ports.

The other alternative people like bringing up, are the budget Cintiq alternatives. You've seen them on amazon, you know, the ones, that look like they are made by the same company, despite having different brand logos slapped onto them. The problem with these brands is that often the pen requires charging, and if you know how the lithium ion batteries work, you know that the pen will need to be replaced eventually. To give you an idea: with every charging time, you will need to recharge your pen more frequently, until eventually, it won't hold even a few hours. This is fine for a 50usd tabled, but for something that costs over 400? Not for me, hon! The other big thing is, that the screen quality on these budget tablets is often worse than that of a cheap IPS monitor. You need your viewing angles so that you can see the colors well, regardless of your posture and you need your color accuracy, so use the money you were about to splurge on the cheap alternative to get an Intuos pro and an affordable IPS monitor! Yes, you won't have the screen to draw onto, but at least you will have an easier time producing art for print, higher build quality, no need to recharge the pen, pen tilt, a much more customizable driver, and a touch feature! Plus - think of your back! :o

*    *    *

There is another elephant in the room, I should address: which is better -- Wacom or non-Wacom? I will give you the same answer I give to anyone who asks that question: if you can afford a Wacom, get a Wacom. If you can't, something else can do the job. It's not the tools that make you a better artist, but your skill and attitude.

Now, a few pieces of advice I would like to give about the graphics tablets:
1. Beware of the cheap third party Wacom nibs! On eBay and amazon, you can find dirt cheap plastic nibs for your stylus: don't use them, they are going to scratch your tablet. I learned this when I decided to try them out. They last nowhere near as long as the original ones do, and I would often wear them down into a sharp point, while with the original one, it was always a much rounder one.
2. Tiny, shallow marks are normal. You are rubbing to materials together, so minor scratches are normal. If you are squeamish about it, for the Wacom tablet, get the flex, or felt nib instead.
3. Don't press your stylus too hard. You don't need to do that, because, not only it causes more stress to your wrist and fingers, but also it wears down your precious nibs faster.
4. Paper for a paper like feel: slap a sheet of your favorite sketch paper on your tablet, and see how you like it! It's not something everyone is into, but a lot of people like it.
5. If you have a cheaper tablet that has an AAA battery in it, leave it on. The AAA batteries hold their charge for a much longer period than the rechargeable ones, and theses batteries are cheap! If you have an on-off switch, leave it on, because these pens are made of cheap plastic, and are prone to breakage. Don't unscrew them too often either, because the plastic will crack. I had this happen with two of these types of styluses.
6. Draw a few sketches to warm up, before drawing.
7. Keep your work area clean by using a slightly damp cloth. DO NOT use any chemicals on your tablet!
8. If your tablet has a nib holder, you can open it to find a few replacement nibs. If you have an entry level Intuos, you can open a compartment at the back of it, ant the replacement nibs should be attached on its lid. your nib remover should be included either as a strange metal ring or a small hole surrounded by metal. If you have a non-Wacom tablet, buy a Wacom rib removal tool on eBay. They are made from a firmer, higher quality steel, and are much easier to work with.
9. Don't store anything on top of your tablet! The only things, that should go near its surface, are your stylus and your hands.
For a long time, Wacom Cintiq was considered the best possible thing an artist would hope to get. Even today most artists drool over them... and then there's me. No, I don't think a screen on your tablet is necessarily improvement, and I will explain this a little further.

Now, we all use them, be it Wacom, huion, monoprice, etc. -- our graphics tablets are a vital tool for our survival as artists. But it's not just the tablets and you that do the job, it's also your PC, which brings me to my first point:

When it comes to efficiency, your computer is more important than your tablet. You can have the fanciest, prettiest tablet or Cintiq ever, but your workflow won't be improved if your potato of a PC crashes every time it tries to render a brush stroke. So, remember, when drooling on that shiny super tablet, that, when it comes to hardware, computer trumps the tablet. Don't get me wrong, a tablet is important, but a tiny, cheap Intuos on a decent PC will perform better, than a shiny new Cintiq on a ten-year-old relic.

The second point I want to make is: remember the shiny screen on that Cintiq? You don't need it! It looks cool, but it has its own downsides. The biggest selling point is that it is more efficient, it is more natural for you to look at your pen when you write or draw, and this is exactly what a Cintiq is! It is a premium product, designed for the professionals who have made it so far in their careers, that they need to churn out one artwork after another. They don't have the time to adjust, edit or redo their lines, like someone who's starting out does. It is a tool meant to increase your speed, but it has serious downsides as well:
    1. Posture: I can't stress this enough, but when working, proper posture is important. Of course, you can have a proper posture when working on a Cintiq, but you are more likely to have it when working with a regular tablet. When we work with a regular tablet, we sit up straight and relaxed, we look straight ahead at our computer monitor. When you have something like a Cintiq, you are most likely going to look down at it, which causes more strain on your neck, and you are more likely to slouch, which results in strain on your shoulders and back. This can cause multiple health issues, and the kicker is, the younger you are when starting this habit, the more and sooner these issues can develop. Remember to sit up straight, adjust your chair so that your knees and elbows are at a 90-degree angle, put something under your feet, if needed, and have your monitor adjusted to your eye level.
    2. Eye strain: is this really a surprise? A computer screen should be about an arm's length away from your eyes, and what if I told you, that the Cintiq is a computer screen? If you are going to stare at it for a prolonged time, make sure to get further away from it, and have your eyes checked. You must use prescription glasses when doing digital art, if you need them.
    3. Arm fatigue: now, this is probably not going to be a major problem for many people. Drawing on a Cintiq in a lot of ways is like drawing on an easel, so you'll need to lift your arm a bit more. When I started to draw still life on an easel, I noticed, that my arm would tire. This is because I spent most of my time drawing on a regular old Intuos, and didn't have to raise my hand so much. You can get used to it, so, it's just my pet peeve, I guess.
    4. The price: the Cintiqs are expensive, and, let's face it, for most artists it is unreasonable to buy something like this. You have to eat, you need that computer upgrade, extra ddr4 ram, better CPU, nicer graphics card. Buy those instead.

What's this, you say? There are more affordable alternatives to the Cintiq? No. No, there isn't. Is an iPad an alternative? Can it run photoshop or Corel Painter? What about Zbrush? No? Then it isn't an alternative.

But surface studio can run them, so it must be a good alternative! Wrong! Do you really want to spend a thousand on something that's going to be obsolete in a few years? Wanna bigger ram? Better processor? A badass gtx 1080? Too, bad, you can't get it, because a surface studio is basically a laptop with a giant screen, and, likely, has its parts soldered to the motherboard. For something that you are not about to carry around, you can save money by buying, or even building, a decent tower PC and getting a good quality monitor, which you can upgrade later to an even better one. A Cintiq or an Intuos is not going to become obsolete. Even in ten years, you will be able to hook it up to any PC that has the required ports.

The other alternative people like bringing up, are the budget Cintiq alternatives. You've seen them on amazon, you know, the ones, that look like they are made by the same company, despite having different brand logos slapped onto them. The problem with these brands is that often the pen requires charging, and if you know how the lithium ion batteries work, you know that the pen will need to be replaced eventually. To give you an idea: with every charging time, you will need to recharge your pen more frequently, until eventually, it won't hold even a few hours. This is fine for a 50usd tabled, but for something that costs over 400? Not for me, hon! The other big thing is, that the screen quality on these budget tablets is often worse than that of a cheap IPS monitor. You need your viewing angles so that you can see the colors well, regardless of your posture and you need your color accuracy, so use the money you were about to splurge on the cheap alternative to get an Intuos pro and an affordable IPS monitor! Yes, you won't have the screen to draw onto, but at least you will have an easier time producing art for print, higher build quality, no need to recharge the pen, pen tilt, a much more customizable driver, and a touch feature! Plus - think of your back! :o

*    *    *

There is another elephant in the room, I should address: which is better -- Wacom or non-Wacom? I will give you the same answer I give to anyone who asks that question: if you can afford a Wacom, get a Wacom. If you can't, something else can do the job. It's not the tools that make you a better artist, but your skill and attitude.

Now, a few pieces of advice I would like to give about the graphics tablets:
1. Beware of the cheap third party Wacom nibs! On eBay and amazon, you can find dirt cheap plastic nibs for your stylus: don't use them, they are going to scratch your tablet. I learned this when I decided to try them out. They last nowhere near as long as the original ones do, and I would often wear them down into a sharp point, while with the original one, it was always a much rounder one.
2. Tiny, shallow marks are normal. You are rubbing to materials together, so minor scratches are normal. If you are squeamish about it, for the Wacom tablet, get the flex, or felt nib instead.
3. Don't press your stylus too hard. You don't need to do that, because, not only it causes more stress to your wrist and fingers, but also it wears down your precious nibs faster.
4. Paper for a paper like feel: slap a sheet of your favorite sketch paper on your tablet, and see how you like it! It's not something everyone is into, but a lot of people like it.
5. If you have a cheaper tablet that has an AAA battery in it, leave it on. The AAA batteries hold their charge for a much longer period than the rechargeable ones, and theses batteries are cheap! If you have an on-off switch, leave it on, because these pens are made of cheap plastic, and are prone to breakage. Don't unscrew them too often either, because the plastic will crack. I had this happen with two of these types of styluses.
6. Draw a few sketches to warm up, before drawing.
7. Keep your work area clean by using a slightly damp cloth. DO NOT use any chemicals on your tablet!
8. If your tablet has a nib holder, you can open it to find a few replacement nibs. If you have an entry level Intuos, you can open a compartment at the back of it, ant the replacement nibs should be attached on its lid. your nib remover should be included either as a strange metal ring or a small hole surrounded by metal. If you have a non-Wacom tablet, buy a Wacom rib removal tool on eBay. They are made from a firmer, higher quality steel, and are much easier to work with.
9. Don't store anything on top of your tablet! The only things, that should go near its surface, are your stylus and your hands.

Comments


Add a Comment:
 
:iconricky4:
ricky4 Featured By Owner Apr 7, 2017
Thanks for the :iconfav3dplz: on   Mindfield by ricky4    Huggle!
Reply
:iconviikingitvalk:
ViikingitValk Featured By Owner Mar 27, 2017  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Thank you very much for adding  Hell of a pilot by ViikingitValk  to your favourites, I'm really glad you like it!:heart:
Also, if you'd like to see more fantasy&fairy-tale arts (and SW arts too) or you'd be interested in commissioning me , you'll be always welcomed here
Reply
:iconjulijanam:
JulijanaM Featured By Owner Feb 9, 2017  Professional General Artist
Thank you so much for the watch Solveiga! :D I appreciate it so so much and I hope you enjoy my future works too! :love:

My other acounts: 

Artstation www.artstation.com/artist/juli…
Instagram www.instagram.com/julijanam_/

I hope I see you there as well! :happybounce: :heart:
Reply
:iconjustacapharnaum:
JustACapharnaum Featured By Owner Jan 12, 2017
Thanks for the watch!
Reply
Flagged as Spam
:iconundeadcrabstick:
undeadcrabstick Featured By Owner Jan 4, 2017  Professional Digital Artist
Nope, and you shouldn't post links like this, might get banned from DA.
Reply
Flagged as Spam
:iconundeadcrabstick:
undeadcrabstick Featured By Owner Jan 4, 2017  Professional Digital Artist
Well then it's a good thing I didn't.
Reply
(2 Replies)
:iconbrunild:
Brunild Featured By Owner Dec 14, 2016   Traditional Artist
Thank you so much for your kind support!! ❤️
Reply
:iconundeadcrabstick:
undeadcrabstick Featured By Owner Dec 15, 2016  Professional Digital Artist
you are welcome and deep up the good work.
Reply
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